Jobs Like Postmates: 10 Freelance Gigs for Delivery Drivers

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I’ve worked as a Postmates Courier and have found it to be a pretty good gig if you’re looking to pick up some money on the side. As long as you’ve got a car and a smartphone, you have a lot of possibilities open to you if you are looking to become a delivery driver.

Postmates is far from the only option out there, however, if you are looking for other jobs like Postmates. Here I’ve compiled a list of 10 freelance gigs for delivery drivers that are similar to Postmates.

Doorman

Currently available in New York City, Chicago, and San Francisco, Doorman is a service that provides delivery to customers for online orders from select retailers like Zara and Zulily. They promise delivery within 1 hour, seven days a week until midnight.

To become a driver with Doorman you need a large vehicle like a van or SUV with car insurance. Bikes, scooters, and motorcycles are acceptable in NYC only. You’ll go to the Doorman warehouse, pick up orders, and then deliver them to the customer with the Doorman app guiding you with GPS directions.

Doorman drivers are paid weekly with an hourly rate and completely flexible hours. As a driver with Doorman, you’ll also be part of a rewards program that provides incentives for performing extra deliveries.

Apply with Doorman here

Roadie

Do you travel by car a lot or are you planning an upcoming road trip? With Roadie you can make some extra money by transporting people’s stuff while you are on your trip. How it works is that people list an item they want to transport such as furniture, a musical instrument, or even a pet, and then list their gig in the Roadie app.

Roadie drivers can see what gigs are available in their area, and if its on a route they plan to take, can accept it to pick up the extra money. To become a Roadie driver, you must be at least 18, have a driver’s license, and auto insurance.

Apply with Roadie here

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Deliv 

This is a company that partners with select retailers to provide same-day delivery services to customers. This could range from retail merchandise to groceries. They currently operate in 17 markets in the United States, including Atlanta, Dallas, Miami, Boston, Chicago, NYC, and Seattle.

Drivers get to pick their own hours and are not required to have a commercial license to drive. To be eligible to become a driver, you must be at least 18 years old, have a smart phone with a data plan, have an insured car that is less than 15 years old with air conditioning, at least one year’s driving experience, and be able to lift up to 50 lbs.

Apply with Deliv Here

Rinse

It seems you can literally find a delivery service for anything these days, and Rinse is no exception. Rinse is a laundry and dry cleaning pickup service where customers can schedule a pickup for a bag of dirty laundry to be washed or clothes in need of dry cleaning for a driver to come retrieve. They are currently operating in Washington D.C., San Francisco and Los Angeles.

The so-called “Rinse Valet Drivers” need a four-door vehicle, a smartphone, and a clean driving record. They receive competitive pay plus mileage reimbursement and work set shifts between 7:30PM and 10:30PM. Valet Drivers are considered part-time (W-2) employees.

Apply with Rinse here

 

Kango

Are you someone that loves working with kids or has experience working in childcare? Then perhaps Kango is right for you. This is a website where people can book both people to babysit as well as drive their kids to school, daycare, soccer games, or wherever else they need to be. They are currently operating in the San Francisco Bay Area only.

Because you are working with kids, they are much more selective in their application process. You need to bass a background check, a fingerprint check, have your DMV records analyzed, and attend a Kango training before becoming a driver. They also have a zero tolerance policy for drug or alcohol use while providing services.

To work with Kango, you need to have previous experience working in childcare, be at least 21, and have a car from 2007 or later. Kango drivers can make $35/hr, plus a $25 sign-on bonus.

Apply with Kango here

Uber EATS

We’ve all heard of Uber. They are clearly leaders in the world of ridesharing and their delivery business offered with Uber EATS is rapidly expanding across the globe. Uber EATS delivery partners can use either a car, bike, or scooter for work depending on what’s available in their city. Your schedule is 100% up to you!

To drive you must be at least 19 years old, have a driver’s license, and a vehicle that is from 1997 or newer. What’s great about Uber EATS is they have a rapid sign-up process so you can get on the road very quickly, plus once you start work you can transfer your earnings to your bank account instantly after a delivery!

Apply here to become an Uber EATS delivery partner

Or to become an Uber driver for the rideshare service (for people not food), go hereSaucey

Typically a designated driver will drive you TO a bar, but with Saucey the driver brings the bar to you! Currently operating in LA, San Francisco, San Diego, Chicago, and Sacramento, Saucey send drivers to deliver beer, wine, spirits, and mixers on-demand in 30 minutes or less.

With Saucey, you get to ride with a car, bike, or motorcycle and you can pick your own shift blocks. They promise that you won’t be going “hundreds of miles” a night doing delivery and that you can pick the neighborhood you’d like to work in. Drivers with Saucey must be willing to check ID’s for all customers and go through proper legal procedures to ensure the product isn’t getting into the wrong (ie underage) hands.

Apply with Saucey here

Bonus offer!

Want to try out Saucey as a customer? Enter the code TRY18 and get a $10 credit

Download iOS app

Download Google Play App

 

Shipt

Grocery shopping is made a little more simple and convenient with Shipt. With this service, customers can order products online for same-day delivery from local grocery stores. Shipt workers will retrieve the items and then drive them to the customers. They currently operate in 16 states, including many areas that other services do not.

They offer flexible schedules and payment up to $25/hr. To become a shopper with Shipt, you must be at least 18, have an insured vehicle that is less than 15 years old, have a driver’s license and a smartphone, and be able to lift at least 25 pounds.

Apply with Shipt here

Bonus offer!

Want to try out Shipt as a customer? Follow this link and get a $20 credit!

Waitr

Do you live in the southern states of Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, and Arkansas? Then perhaps you should check out Waitr. This is a food-delivery app that displays a simple layout with high-resolution images of the items available to order from local restaurants. Customers order through the app, and drivers come deliver it.

To drive with Waitr, you need a reliable and insured vehicle, a smartphone, a clean driving record, and a driver’s license. You have flexible shifts and get paid via direct deposit weekly. You can expect to make $12-$15/hr. on average with Waitr.

Apply with Waitr here

Zesty

Zesty is a workplace catering company that delivers healthy meals to businesses in the Bay Area. They work with over 150 restaurants to prepare meals based on their clients needs that are delivered to their offices and served “family-style”- no boxed lunches here!

To become a driver with Zesty, you must be at least 18 years old, have a reliable and insured vehicle, have a smartphone, be willing to get a food handler card, and be available to work two lunch shifts from Monday to Friday. Drivers work as 1099 independent contractors, working shifts from 1-2 hours at a time, and can make $25/hr.

Apply with Zesty here (click on “Contractors/Commissary” under “Open Positions”)

If you enjoyed this post, make sure to follow this blog for more tips on side gigs to make extra money, as well as follow me on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Thanks for reading!

 

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Safety Tips for Delivery Drivers

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If you have a vehicle and a smartphone, delivery driving can be a good means of earning income. Whether you are delivering with an on-demand app like Postmates or UberEATS, or are delivering pizzas with a local pizza shop, you’ll find many options out there for work.

There are certain precautions to take into consideration, however, if you plan to start delivering. Here I’ve assembled some safety tips for delivery drivers.

Beware of Dogs

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Just as it is with postal workers, who are infamously at risk of dog attacks, delivery drivers must be concerned about dogs and other animals at the homes where they are delivering to. If you see a large animal or a “Beware of Dog” sign at the residence where you are dropping off a delivery, consider calling the customer and seeing if they can meet you outside before entering their yard.

According to an article from WikiHow, if a dog approaches you and appears aggressive, stay calm and don’t run. If the dog senses fear they will feel more comfortable attacking. It’s also better not to engage with the dog, and to stay motionless. Only when a dog is clearly going to attack you should you speak to it in a commanding voice and tell it to go away.

There’s special equipment you can bring with you that deters dogs, but doesn’t harm them, such as a dog repellant buzzer or a fog spray. This should only be used if you feel a dog is aggressive and might attack.

In the event that a dog does attack you, seek immediate medical attention, contact the police, and if you feel it’s necessary seek legal action, certain states hold dog owner’s liable for attacks. It’s important to seek medical treatments and contact the authorities immediately to determine if the dog has a history of attacking or has a disease such as rabies.

Keep Your Eyes on the Road

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When driving for a service like Postmates or GrubHub, you have to use your smartphone in order to accept deliveries, get GPS directions, and communicate with the customers. When you are balancing out your time working from your smartphone with driving to pickup and drop-off deliveries, however, this can be particularly dangerous if you aren’t careful.

You should shorten the time you use your smartphone when driving to the absolute minimum, if at all. While waiting to accept deliveries, wait in a parking lot (where you feel safe) and don’t start driving again until you have finished accepting the order, plugging in your GPS directions, and texting the customer. Keep a dashboard mount in your vehicle so your phone remains in your line of sight while driving if using turn-based navigation.

It’s always better to pull over to the side of the road and take a couple of minutes of time out to use your phone while you aren’t driving, than it is to sacrifice your personal safety by using your phone when driving. Always drive safe and resist the urge to speed. You can expedite your time by working promptly when at the drop-off and pickup locations.

Stay Alert and Aware of Your Surroundings

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Delivery driving is a job that requires you to walk onto the private properties of strangers, which comes with a number of risks. Stay on your guard and use common sense when walking to and from people’s homes. If someone ever offers for you to come inside, politely decline and remain at their door- don’t ever enter someone else’s house or apartment.

If you are delivering to a neighborhood at night or to a region that makes you feel uneasy, minimize the time you are outside of your vehicle. Make sure you have pinpointed exactly where the house or apartment is that you are doing the delivery and call the customer before exiting your vehicle so they know you’ve arrived. If for some reason the customer doesn’t answer the door, go back inside your vehicle while waiting for them to respond.

Always prioritize your personal safety. If the the customers asks you to do something that seems unusual like deliver to an abandoned parking lot, trust your instincts and decline their request. Make sure to report any suspicious activity to the company you’re working with.

You Come First, the Food Comes Second

Remember that your personal safety is more important than someone receiving their food order, period. Should a customer make you feel uncomfortable or a situation arise that would jeopardize your delivery time in exchange for taking extra safety precautions, put yourself first. ALWAYS.

If you enjoyed this post, make sure to follow this blog for more tips on side gigs to make extra money, as well as follow me on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Thanks for reading!

How to Make More Money from Tips as a Food Delivery Driver

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Whether you work for an on-demand food delivery app service like Postmates or Uber EATS or you deliver pizzas for your local Italian eatery, there are some strategies you can utilize if you want to ensure you get good tips and maximize your earnings. Here are some things I’ve come up with that help to keep the customers happy, provide exceptional service, and make sure they return to repeat business.

Text the Customer and Introduce Yourself

When customers order food online or through an app it can seem like a very mechanical experience. For all they know, a robot could be delivering the food to them. And while robot delivery isn’t the industry standard (yet!), it is still helpful to introduce yourself to the customer to help humanize the experience.

A simple text message that shows personality, tells them your first name, and offers to be there if they have any questions can go a long way in establishing that you are indeed a real person and are genuinely trying to consider their needs. Of course you need to hurry when you are working on deliveries, so I recommend using your phone’s text-to-speech feature or sending them a picture of a standard greeting so you don’t have to type the message each time.

This goes without saying but be VERY CAREFUL when using your phone while doing deliveries. It is better to send a brief text-to-speech message BEFORE YOU START DRIVING than to text while you are on the road. Always prioritize your personal safety above all else. 

Keep the Customer Updated if There Are Any Delays

If there are any issues, send the customer a text and let them know about anything that could delay their order. If you work for a company like Postmates, for example, where you have to place restaurant orders on behalf of customers, let them know if there is a long-wait time and give them an estimate of how soon you can get on the road.

Should there be any trouble with the delivery or if you need to substitute a menu item, call the customer and clarify what they would like to do.

Get Lots of Condiments and Free Stuff From the Restaurants

Unless the customer specifically tells you they don’t want a certain condiment or utensil, go ahead and grab whatever is available (for free at least) amongst the restaurant’s selection of condiments. If there are ketchup packets, soy sauce packets, salt and pepper packets, parmesan packets, plastic cutlery, napkins, taco sauces, breath mints, or anything similar that you can take for free- GET IT.

When delivering for Postmates, I even keep a small selection of ketchup packets, taco sauce, and soy sauce with me at all times just in case a customer ever needs it. This is a small way that you can show the customer you were thinking ahead of what they might want with their order.

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Smile, Be Courteous, and Make Small Talk When You Drop Off the Deliveries

Your interactions with the customer in-person will be very brief so make it count. You don’t want to act like a zombie who says nothing and just hands over a bag of food. Put on a bright smile, ask the customer how their day is going, and comment on the weather or make other forms of small talk as you hand them their order. If they have a garden or anything interesting in the front of their house, make sure to compliment it.

Plus, if you picked up extra condiments for them, this is a good time to specifically mention this to the customer so you get credit for doing so! Say something like, “I made sure to get some extra ketchup packets in case you needed them” so they know that YOU were the one who thought to pick it up for the customer.

Send a Final Text Message to the Customer Thanking Them

I always send a brief message to the customer after I finish up my Postmates deliveries where I include three things- a brief thanks for their business, a reminder to please leave a review, and a final wish for them to enjoy their food and have a good day. I NEVER mention anything about tipping, but might still casually nudge them in the direction of it.

In the Postmates app, the screen where they leave the review is the same screen where they tip (HOW coincidental! What ARE the chances?!). Thus encouraging them to review me subtly leads them towards tipping.

Conclusion

When it all comes down to it, the same age-old standards of customer service apply. Be helpful and efficient, respond well to the customer’s needs, and go the extra mile to demonstrate that you are going out of your way to make the customer happy. If they can tell you are making an earnest attempt to do well at your job that often can lead to higher tips.

If you enjoyed this post, make sure to follow this blog for more updates on frugal living, as well as stay updated on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Thanks for reading!

Working for GrubHub vs. Postmates: What are the Differences?

Working for GrubHub vs Postmates

Hello everyone! As you may have seen on my blog or my YouTube videos, I have worked as a delivery driver for both GrubHub and Postmates. Some people have asked me about what the differences are between the two, so I thought I would take some time and write about the differences between working for the two companies as a driver.

The Hiring Process

Getting hired with GrubHub, at least in my geographic region, was pretty similar to Postmates. I did not have an actual “interview” with either company and instead my hiring as an independent contractor depended on the submission of an online form and the successful passing of a background check. It seemed like maybe there were more vehicle-specific questions with GrubHub than there were with Postmates.

Training

This is where things got a little bit different. GrubHub required that I attend either an in-person or online training session before starting work as a driver. Postmates, on the other hand, required only that I watch a brief training video before driving. I felt a little more prepared for the job with GrubHub before starting work than I did with Postmates as a result. I would highly recommend that Postmates Couriers take some time out and read both the help forums on the Postmates Fleet website and read about the experiences of Couriers online for advice before starting work.

Scheduling

This is an area that is MUCH different between the two companies-

GrubHub requires that you sign up for specific shifts called “blocks,” which are offered on a first come, first serve basis. The blocks are typically short, 2-5 hour chunks of time and there are always more blocks offered around lunch and dinner. Once you have signed up for a block you MUST work that block, get a replacement, or try to call the Drivercare line to drop it just like you would with a regular job. If you don’t show up for a scheduled block you may be penalized or have your contract revoked. You are not required to work a minimum number of hours (nor do you have a maximum) and you are never under obligation to sign up for a block.

Because the blocks are first come, first serve, sometimes you may not be able to work at the times you would really prefer and I found myself working multiple blocks with huge gaps of time in between when I would have preferred to continue working. A typical Saturday for me might be 11AM-2PM (1st block), a three hour break, then I’d work 5PM-9PM (second block) if I wasn’t able to get the late afternoon hours before others grabbed them.

Postmates is significantly more flexible in this area. You do have to work at any specific time and and there are no shifts or “blocks” to sign up for. You can literally just get in your vehicle and work whenever you want to. Just like with GrubHub there is no minimum or maximum number of hours you have to work. The only thing is, with Postmates you are not offered an hourly minimum so it will still be advantageous for you to work during lunch and dinner when the business is most heavy.

Work Gear

Postmates provides you with one insulated tote bag that will keep the temperature of the food regulated during your deliveries, plus a Postmates credit card to make purchases for the customers (if you want more info on how this works, check out my blog post here). At least in my region, you do not get a shirt of hat and can wear whatever you want during deliveries.

GrubHub provides two bags (one small and one large), a hat, a cap, and a laminated sign to put in your windshield. I much preferred having the extra gear that designated to the customers and the restaurants that I was indeed a GrubHub delivery driver.

Need an hourly job? Search over 250,000 part-time and full-time hourly positions on Snagajob.

Support for Drivers

GrubHub offers a “Driver Care” phone line that you can call at any time during your deliveries when you have trouble. While they do offer help menus in the driver app if you wish to figure out things on your own, there were a number of times when  I still found myself calling this phone line and enjoyed having it as a resource.

Postmates, on the other hand, does not offer a driver care phone line. In most cases you must go through the help menus in the app to fix your problems. There are situations where if you encounter very specific issues and enter details about them in the help menus, Postmates may place an outbound phone call your way to help you out but it is very rare and difficult to prompt such phone calls. You must be willing to work independently and autonomously when working as a Postmates Courier.

The Work Flow

GrubHub has you delivering from restaurants only and it’s a pretty basic process- you go in, pick up the order, and go out. In my region I was usually a little bit less busy with GrubHub than I was with Postmates and often found myself waiting in my car doing nothing. The upside to this, though, was that I was guaranteed an hourly minimum so I would still get paid during my block even if the base pay wasn’t all that much.

Postmates is more complex in the scope of its services to customers- they can deliver from ANY store or restaurant and you will need to pay for certain orders yourself with the Postmates credit card. On occasion you will need to place the orders to the restaurants as well. This creates a more varied work experience. Because Postmates doesn’t offer an hourly minimum but rather a base minimum per order, you will need to stay busy on your shift if you want to make money. This requires a bit more strategy than it does driving for GrubHub.

If I ever find myself waiting around in my vehicle without any orders with Postmates, this will mean I MUST move to a busier area (or work during a peak time around lunch or dinner) if I want to make money. As a result of this I’ve had to carefully consider the neighborhoods and times of day I choose to work. Driving around looking for orders uses up more gas so I also have needed to be more strategic with my gas usage.

Tipping

GrubHub customers must pay their tips in advance of receiving the food through the app because of the way the app is structured, if they tip with a credit card that is. Cash tips were more rare (at least for my orders) with GrubHub. The app prompts the customer to leave a tip and it is framed as a standard for the customers to do so (which is a plus for the drivers). The issue is, however, that because the credit card tippers must submit it before you actually deliver the food, the tip is not influenced by your customer service. So if you really go above and beyond to connect with the customer that will not be factored into the tip (unless they tip in cash).

Postmates customers pay their tips after you deliver the food. The app will prompt them with a notification (if they have notifications turned on) to please leave a review and to tip the driver after the food has been dropped off. While most customers tip through the app, I did receive more cash tips with Postmates. You have to be a bit more diligent in your efforts to impress the customers if you want to receive good tips. I try to make the customers happy by sending them texts with updates as I’m getting their order picked up as a way to introduce myself to them and humanize an otherwise automated, tech-driven experience. I will have another blog entry at a later date with some of my advice for getting better tips when working as a Postmates Courier, but I think it is possible to get MORE money in tips with Postmates than you can with GrubHub if you play your cards right.

Pay Frequency

GrubHub drivers get paid for a work week (running Monday through Sunday) every following Thursday, and then it takes 3-5 business days to process. As I’ve written about previously, however, it’s possible to get paid daily with DailyPay which is a third-party service that works with GrubHub to pay drivers in advance with small payments up-front before pay day. It’s not a loan, there’s no credit check, and there’s no extra fees to sign up. The only thing you have to pay are small transfer fees every time you transfer to your bank account. The really awesome thing is that you can now get your money transferred to your bank the same day it’s available, including weekends and holidays!

You can find out more about DailyPay here

Try it for two weeks FREE (without any transfer fees) by following this link

Postmates on the other hand, will make daily transfers to your bank account within 5 business days that the money is earned. There is a small transfer fee that you pay with their transfers and you will get your payments in a longer amount of time than you would working for GrubHub and using DailyPay.

My Thoughts

GrubHub is a little more structured and offers more driver support and training but is significantly less flexible when it comes to scheduling. Postmates offers much less driver support and training, requires a bit more strategy if you want to earn a good amount of money, but is ultimately way more accommodating when it comes to schedule flexibility. Whichever company is right for you is going to depend on what you are looking for personally. Depending on the hours you work, I would say their pay is relatively competitive with each other. With both companies the basic principles of working during lunch and dinner, going to busy “hotspots,” and keeping a good, efficient workflow (without speeding!) are going to be your best bets for making the most income.

 If you enjoyed this post, make sure to follow this blog for more updates on frugal living, as well as stay updated on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Thanks for reading!

Working as a Postmates Courier (aka Delivery Driver): What It’s Like!

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As you may have read from my other blog entries, I have previously worked as a GrubHub delivery driver. This was an interesting experience that was an overall good way to pick up some extra cash. When I found out about an opportunity to work as a Postmates Courier, however, I decided to try it and see how my experiences could compare to GrubHub.

I will go over the differences between being a driver for the two companies in more depth in a separate blog entry, but for now will recap the basics of what working as a Postmates Courier is like.

How Postmates Works

Postmates is different from other companies in that the customers can order things for delivery through their app from ANYWHERE. This could be food from restaurants, groceries from a grocery store, gardening equipment from a hardware store, toiletries from the pharmacy- if it is a product you can purchase from a store or restaurant then you can order it for delivery from Postmates (certain items like alcohol or tobacco are banned but these vary by region).

While you can technically order from anywhere, the app does still direct the customers to specific, featured merchants when they first open the app. Stores and restaurants that have partnered with Postmates will be prominently featured as part of Postmates Plus where they have a flat delivery fee of $3.99. Merchants that are not part of Postmates Plus will likely have higher delivery fees, although Postmates frequently sends out promo codes for reduced fees to the app customers.

The Hiring Process

To become a Postmates Courier you must be 18 years or older, have a smartphone with  a data plan, and a valid U.S. driver’s license. In some regions you are required to drive and own a car, but in others you can deliver by biking or walking as well (typically in major cities like LA or San Francisco). You apply online and in my region the hiring and orientation processes were entirely over the internet- there was no “in-person” training or interview.

You must pass a background check (including your driving history) in order to get hired. I was literally asked zero questions for the interview process other than the online application form. It seems that if you apply at the right time and have a decent driving record you’ll get in. The training was VERY minimal. There was a brief video to watch (approx. 3 minutes long) that goes away after you watch it and that was it!

You must rely on their Postmates Fleet Help website for most of your basic instructions for how to do the job.

What the Actual Work is Like

You are completely on your own for this job! There is no driver support phone line, just a series of troubleshooting menus to go through in the app if you run into any problems. You definitely need to be prepared to work independently and think quickly if you have any issues.

You do not have any specific shift either. You can literally get in your car and work whenever you want (or stay home when you don’t want to work for that matter!). This flexibility is very nice, although it also means there could be times where too many drivers start working and you don’t get as many orders. There’s nothing to stop “overstaffing.”

When business is booming and there aren’t enough drivers on the road, however, it triggers a “blitz” where you can get paid extra. It will send you a notification when this is being offered. Like with other delivery services; bad weather, holidays, and special events like the Super Bowl will trigger more delivery orders from customers.

You will receive a tote bag to transport your deliveries in that keeps the food temperature regulated, and a Postmates credit card to make purchases with (more details below).

Using the App and Picking Up/Dropping Off the Orders

Your phone will send you a notification when you are logged into the Postmates Fleet app (separate from the app the customers use) when there is an order available. You have the option to accept or reject an order. That I know of, there is not a penalty for rejecting an order. Be aware, though, that if you do not accept the order VERY QUICKLY, it will pass it on to another driver.

Once you accept an order, the app will give you a button to tap on for directions to the restaurant or store with a map. Each business has its own set of interaction with Postmates. Some are set up like GrubHub (if you’ve driven with them) where the order goes directly to the restaurant for them to prepare and the payment is processed solely between the business and the customer. With others there is nothing set up between Postmates and the merchant, so you must use your Postmates credit card to make the purchase at the store.

How this works is that whenever a customer submits an order for a merchant that hasn’t set up a payment system directly with Postmates, Postmates will add a balance on the card for the approximate value of the customer’s purchase (they always round up a little bit to accommodate everything). You will go into the store or restaurant and pay for the order with your card just like you’re a regular customer. You will NEVER have to pay using your own money- you only ever use the Postmates credit card.

Once you’ve picked up the order, you indicate this on the app and it will give you directions to the customer’s drop-off location. If gives you an option to text or call the customer if you need any help finding their place. Once you’ve dropped off the order you indicate this on the app and it closes out the order.

Certain items like tobacco products or alcohol will prompt for you to check the customer’s ID before giving them the merchandise.

The Pay

Now here’s the big question everybody has- how much do they pay? This is something that varies by region, but you can see detailed information by region here. The basic structure is that you get a base payment for every order, plus a small mileage reimbursement, payment for the time you spend waiting for orders to be prepared, and 100% of your tips. There is NO hourly pay or hourly minimum but there is a minimum guarantee per order.

This means that if you receive few to no orders you will not be guaranteed an hourly minimum so it is better to work during times where there is a guarantee of being busy.

Your pay is automatically transferred to your bank account within five business days of earning it. There is a $0.15 fee for every transfer to your bank.

Here’s an example of their payment structure

In Minneapolis you get a base payment of…

$1.75 per order + $0.14/minute for time waiting at pickup location + $0.91/mile for distance from pickup to drop-off location + your tips. You are also guaranteed a minimum of $4.10 per order (regardless of tips).

On your first order you had to wait 20 minutes for the restaurant to prepare the food and you drove 3 miles to deliver it, plus you got a $5.00 tip. So you get $1.75+$2.80+$2.73= $7.28 as your payment and $12.28 including your tip.

On your second order you didn’t have to wait because the food was ready to pick up, the customer was only 1 mile away, and you got $2.00 as a tip. Because $1.75+$0.91= $2.66, your payment would round up to $4.10 for a total of $6.10 with the tip.

Let’s say in this example it took you a total of 1 hour and 20 minutes to complete these two orders, including the time to go TO the pickup locations. This means you made $18.38 for two orders, or ~$13.80 per hour (not factoring in gas expenses). 

I would say a realistic expectation for Couriers in most midsize cities is to make $10-$15/hr. after factoring out taxes (take note that taxes are NOT deducted from your pay, but you will of course still have to pay them)  and gas expenses. I’ve heard people from cities like New York and San Francisco say they could make more than that due to more frequent orders and tips from larger ticket items, though, so it will probably be influenced heavily by the region you are working in.

Conclusion

The ability to get in your vehicle and work whenever you want is a very nice component of working for Postmates. For people with unpredictable schedules, or those that are trying to squeeze this work on top of another job, the flexibility Postmates offers could be a huge asset. Between GrubHub and Postmates, I will say that each company has it’s own pros and cons but I do consider one to necessarily be superior to the other. I will make a follow-up blog post where I discuss the differences in more depth.

If you are interested in trying out delivery driving with Postmates, I say go for it!

To apply to become a Postmates Courier, follow this link

For information on other delivery driving jobs, go here

Check out the Postmates Fleet Help Center for more information

If you enjoyed this post, make sure to follow this blog for more updates on frugal living, as well as stay updated on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Thanks for reading!

What is DailyPay and How Can It Benefit On-Demand Drivers? *UPDATED*

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This post contains affiliate links from DailyPay

As you may have seen already on my blog, I have worked as a delivery driver for GrubHub. This was an overall interesting experience for me and a great way to pick up some extra income. I can say as a driver, though, that when you’ve worked a bunch of hours to earn some extra cash, having to wait until payday to actually get that money is a huge bummer.

Which brings me to DailyPay. DailyPay is a service that lets on-demand drivers for companies like GrubHub, DoorDash, and Fasten get their daily earnings up-front rather than having to wait till payday. This isn’t a loan and you don’t have to pay it back. All of your money will come to you through DailyPay, and then GrubHub will send them your earnings total for each pay period to make up the difference.  Be aware that because DailyPay can’t see your tips total with GrubHub, tips for GrubHub drivers will still come after one business day of your normal payday. The cost for it comes from a small transfer fee each time you elect to receive your payment.

How it works

After you’ve worked your blocks for a day with GrubHub, they will officially record and report your earnings to DailyPay two days later. There is a slight delay because of the way GrubHub reports your earnings, but all other apps will have your daily earnings reported the same day you worked.

Once DailyPay knows your daily earnings total, they will then in turn put this money into your “Available Balance” the following business day, which is almost like a checking account. You can choose to transfer from your Available Balance whenever you wish– automatically each day, every other day, as needed, etc. (take note, though, that if you initiate a manual transfer after 5:30PM ET it will transfer in two business days).

EDIT: There are now two payment options, AutoNext, which functions like the description above where you get the money deposited into your bank account the following business day, and AutoNow where you get the money deposited into your bank account the SAME DAY it hits your available balance including WEEKENDS AND HOLIDAYS!

Once you’ve set up your transfer, DailyPay will get the total of the earnings you made for that day, subtract out the fee, and send you your hard-earned cash. Transfers up to $150 are $0.99 and transfers over $150 are $1.49. There is now one flat transfer fee of $1.25 for AutoNext transfers regardless of the amount. AutoNow transfers are $2.49. MANUAL next-business day transfers are $1.99, and same-day manual transfers are $2.99. You can always save money by only taking out the money as needed throughout your week and there are no other fees. The money is direct-deposited into either a bank account or prepaid debit card and there are no contracts so you can cancel whenever you wish. Plus, there’s no credit check and it’s FREE to sign up!

If you are among the over 10,000 on-demand drivers currently using their service this could be a good way to get some money early when you have bills to pay or unexpected financial situations occur before payday.

Try it out and get two weeks FREE!

If you are a driver that is interested in trying it out, click on this link here. Because I’m all about saving you money, you can get TWO WEEKS FREE by following my link!

If you are a restaurant owner, there are some services offered to you as well. If you are using GrubHub or Seamless to accept orders at your business, DailyPay offers you the ability to receive the money owed to your restaurant from the food delivery services in advance. When you’ve got a staff to pay and supplies to order this could be super helpful!

It operates similar in structure to what the drivers have- no contract, no credit checks, no early termination fee. The fees are slightly higher at $2.49 for transfers up to $250, $5.99 for transfers at $250-$500, and $9.99 for transfers greater than $500.

For restaurant owners, click on this link to get TWO WEEKS FREE as well!

If you enjoyed this post, make sure to follow this blog for more updates on frugal living, as well as stay updated on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Thanks for reading!