Jobs Like Postmates: 10 Freelance Gigs for Delivery Drivers

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I’ve worked as a Postmates Courier and have found it to be a pretty good gig if you’re looking to pick up some money on the side. As long as you’ve got a car and a smartphone, you have a lot of possibilities open to you if you are looking to become a delivery driver.

Postmates is far from the only option out there, however, if you are looking for other jobs like Postmates. Here I’ve compiled a list of 10 freelance gigs for delivery drivers that are similar to Postmates.

Doorman

Currently available in New York City, Chicago, and San Francisco, Doorman is a service that provides delivery to customers for online orders from select retailers like Zara and Zulily. They promise delivery within 1 hour, seven days a week until midnight.

To become a driver with Doorman you need a large vehicle like a van or SUV with car insurance. Bikes, scooters, and motorcycles are acceptable in NYC only. You’ll go to the Doorman warehouse, pick up orders, and then deliver them to the customer with the Doorman app guiding you with GPS directions.

Doorman drivers are paid weekly with an hourly rate and completely flexible hours. As a driver with Doorman, you’ll also be part of a rewards program that provides incentives for performing extra deliveries.

Apply with Doorman here

Roadie

Do you travel by car a lot or are you planning an upcoming road trip? With Roadie you can make some extra money by transporting people’s stuff while you are on your trip. How it works is that people list an item they want to transport such as furniture, a musical instrument, or even a pet, and then list their gig in the Roadie app.

Roadie drivers can see what gigs are available in their area, and if its on a route they plan to take, can accept it to pick up the extra money. To become a Roadie driver, you must be at least 18, have a driver’s license, and auto insurance.

Apply with Roadie here

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Deliv 

This is a company that partners with select retailers to provide same-day delivery services to customers. This could range from retail merchandise to groceries. They currently operate in 17 markets in the United States, including Atlanta, Dallas, Miami, Boston, Chicago, NYC, and Seattle.

Drivers get to pick their own hours and are not required to have a commercial license to drive. To be eligible to become a driver, you must be at least 18 years old, have a smart phone with a data plan, have an insured car that is less than 15 years old with air conditioning, at least one year’s driving experience, and be able to lift up to 50 lbs.

Apply with Deliv Here

Rinse

It seems you can literally find a delivery service for anything these days, and Rinse is no exception. Rinse is a laundry and dry cleaning pickup service where customers can schedule a pickup for a bag of dirty laundry to be washed or clothes in need of dry cleaning for a driver to come retrieve. They are currently operating in Washington D.C., San Francisco and Los Angeles.

The so-called “Rinse Valet Drivers” need a four-door vehicle, a smartphone, and a clean driving record. They receive competitive pay plus mileage reimbursement and work set shifts between 7:30PM and 10:30PM. Valet Drivers are considered part-time (W-2) employees.

Apply with Rinse here

 

Kango

Are you someone that loves working with kids or has experience working in childcare? Then perhaps Kango is right for you. This is a website where people can book both people to babysit as well as drive their kids to school, daycare, soccer games, or wherever else they need to be. They are currently operating in the San Francisco Bay Area only.

Because you are working with kids, they are much more selective in their application process. You need to bass a background check, a fingerprint check, have your DMV records analyzed, and attend a Kango training before becoming a driver. They also have a zero tolerance policy for drug or alcohol use while providing services.

To work with Kango, you need to have previous experience working in childcare, be at least 21, and have a car from 2007 or later. Kango drivers can make $35/hr, plus a $25 sign-on bonus.

Apply with Kango here

Uber EATS

We’ve all heard of Uber. They are clearly leaders in the world of ridesharing and their delivery business offered with Uber EATS is rapidly expanding across the globe. Uber EATS delivery partners can use either a car, bike, or scooter for work depending on what’s available in their city. Your schedule is 100% up to you!

To drive you must be at least 19 years old, have a driver’s license, and a vehicle that is from 1997 or newer. What’s great about Uber EATS is they have a rapid sign-up process so you can get on the road very quickly, plus once you start work you can transfer your earnings to your bank account instantly after a delivery!

Apply here to become an Uber EATS delivery partner

Or to become an Uber driver for the rideshare service (for people not food), go hereSaucey

Typically a designated driver will drive you TO a bar, but with Saucey the driver brings the bar to you! Currently operating in LA, San Francisco, San Diego, Chicago, and Sacramento, Saucey send drivers to deliver beer, wine, spirits, and mixers on-demand in 30 minutes or less.

With Saucey, you get to ride with a car, bike, or motorcycle and you can pick your own shift blocks. They promise that you won’t be going “hundreds of miles” a night doing delivery and that you can pick the neighborhood you’d like to work in. Drivers with Saucey must be willing to check ID’s for all customers and go through proper legal procedures to ensure the product isn’t getting into the wrong (ie underage) hands.

Apply with Saucey here

Bonus offer!

Want to try out Saucey as a customer? Enter the code TRY18 and get a $10 credit

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Shipt

Grocery shopping is made a little more simple and convenient with Shipt. With this service, customers can order products online for same-day delivery from local grocery stores. Shipt workers will retrieve the items and then drive them to the customers. They currently operate in 16 states, including many areas that other services do not.

They offer flexible schedules and payment up to $25/hr. To become a shopper with Shipt, you must be at least 18, have an insured vehicle that is less than 15 years old, have a driver’s license and a smartphone, and be able to lift at least 25 pounds.

Apply with Shipt here

Bonus offer!

Want to try out Shipt as a customer? Follow this link and get a $20 credit!

Waitr

Do you live in the southern states of Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, and Arkansas? Then perhaps you should check out Waitr. This is a food-delivery app that displays a simple layout with high-resolution images of the items available to order from local restaurants. Customers order through the app, and drivers come deliver it.

To drive with Waitr, you need a reliable and insured vehicle, a smartphone, a clean driving record, and a driver’s license. You have flexible shifts and get paid via direct deposit weekly. You can expect to make $12-$15/hr. on average with Waitr.

Apply with Waitr here

Zesty

Zesty is a workplace catering company that delivers healthy meals to businesses in the Bay Area. They work with over 150 restaurants to prepare meals based on their clients needs that are delivered to their offices and served “family-style”- no boxed lunches here!

To become a driver with Zesty, you must be at least 18 years old, have a reliable and insured vehicle, have a smartphone, be willing to get a food handler card, and be available to work two lunch shifts from Monday to Friday. Drivers work as 1099 independent contractors, working shifts from 1-2 hours at a time, and can make $25/hr.

Apply with Zesty here (click on “Contractors/Commissary” under “Open Positions”)

If you enjoyed this post, make sure to follow this blog for more tips on side gigs to make extra money, as well as follow me on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Thanks for reading!

 

What is “The Gig Economy” and How Can I Use it to Make Some Extra Money?

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After the success of companies like Uber and Airbnb, many others have tried to capitalize on the rush of shoppers and workers ready and willing to use their smartphones to find and post gigs. These companies often rely on contract workers, who work on their own schedules and are not legally considered employees.

While this has come with its own set of complications and controversies, this allows potential workers the flexibility to work (or not) whenever they choose.

Maybe you’re a musician that teaches lessons and creates jingles on the side when you aren’t touring with your band. Or perhaps you’re a student that drives with a ridesharing service to pay your way through school (or, let’s get real, at least pay your room and board). If so, you’re one of countless others that can benefit from the work offered through the so-called “gig economy.”

As Forbes magazine has reported, by 2020 43% of the U.S. workforce will work freelance in some capacity or another. As a freelance worker in the gig economy, you’ll be part of a larger trend in the workforce, but is freelance work right for you? Read more to find out.

The Benefits of The Gig Economy 

The biggest draw to freelance work is the flexibility that it offers. You can work whenever you want, and depending on the nature of the work, wherever you want as well. If you have a particular passion like photography or web design, freelance work can give you an opportunity to either supplement your income while you chase your dreams or get some money doing the things you love while you work a regular 9 to 5 job.

You’ll also have a lot of variety to your workday and won’t have to worry about a boss criticizing your work because YOU get to be your own boss!

There are certain gigs that make up what is called “the sharing economy.” When consumers choose to rent pre-existing resources like a bicycle from a neighbor, rather than buy brand-new products, it decreases the need for consumer goods for the benefit of the environment. Much has been written about the environmental benefits of the sharing economy, for better or worse.

The Downsides to The Gig Economy

Working as a freelancer means you need to be able to prioritize your time and push yourself to work hard, which can be a challenge if you don’t have a set schedule. You’ll also be without benefits like a 401(k) retirement plan or medical insurance, so you’ll need to cover savings and healthcare costs on your own.

You’ll also not be covered with the same legal protections when you are working as a contractor instead of an employee. So if you’re injured on the job, for instance, you won’t be able to file for workman’s comp. Several companies that operate on-demand apps have been faced with lawsuits over classifying their workers as independent contractors instead of employees, so this remains a bit of a murky legal area that may change over time.

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Where Can I Go to Find Gigs?

If you’re looking for ways to find freelance gigs, you have numerous options out there, particularly with websites and apps that connect freelancers to customers. I’ve assembled lists on my blog such as Jobs Like Uber: 15 Alternatives for Freelance Work and Sites Like Airbnb: Make Extra Money By Renting Out Your Humble Abode that can help steer you towards potential gigs.

Each week I have new articles and videos right here on The Thrifty Man blog that will provide you with new ways to make extra money and save extra money. Make sure to bookmark my homepage and subscribe to my YouTube channel, plus follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest for updates!

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Working as a Postmates Courier (aka Delivery Driver): What It’s Like!

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As you may have read from my other blog entries, I have previously worked as a GrubHub delivery driver. This was an interesting experience that was an overall good way to pick up some extra cash. When I found out about an opportunity to work as a Postmates Courier, however, I decided to try it and see how my experiences could compare to GrubHub.

I will go over the differences between being a driver for the two companies in more depth in a separate blog entry, but for now will recap the basics of what working as a Postmates Courier is like.

How Postmates Works

Postmates is different from other companies in that the customers can order things for delivery through their app from ANYWHERE. This could be food from restaurants, groceries from a grocery store, gardening equipment from a hardware store, toiletries from the pharmacy- if it is a product you can purchase from a store or restaurant then you can order it for delivery from Postmates (certain items like alcohol or tobacco are banned but these vary by region).

While you can technically order from anywhere, the app does still direct the customers to specific, featured merchants when they first open the app. Stores and restaurants that have partnered with Postmates will be prominently featured as part of Postmates Plus where they have a flat delivery fee of $3.99. Merchants that are not part of Postmates Plus will likely have higher delivery fees, although Postmates frequently sends out promo codes for reduced fees to the app customers.

The Hiring Process

To become a Postmates Courier you must be 18 years or older, have a smartphone with  a data plan, and a valid U.S. driver’s license. In some regions you are required to drive and own a car, but in others you can deliver by biking or walking as well (typically in major cities like LA or San Francisco). You apply online and in my region the hiring and orientation processes were entirely over the internet- there was no “in-person” training or interview.

You must pass a background check (including your driving history) in order to get hired. I was literally asked zero questions for the interview process other than the online application form. It seems that if you apply at the right time and have a decent driving record you’ll get in. The training was VERY minimal. There was a brief video to watch (approx. 3 minutes long) that goes away after you watch it and that was it!

You must rely on their Postmates Fleet Help website for most of your basic instructions for how to do the job.

What the Actual Work is Like

You are completely on your own for this job! There is no driver support phone line, just a series of troubleshooting menus to go through in the app if you run into any problems. You definitely need to be prepared to work independently and think quickly if you have any issues.

You do not have any specific shift either. You can literally get in your car and work whenever you want (or stay home when you don’t want to work for that matter!). This flexibility is very nice, although it also means there could be times where too many drivers start working and you don’t get as many orders. There’s nothing to stop “overstaffing.”

When business is booming and there aren’t enough drivers on the road, however, it triggers a “blitz” where you can get paid extra. It will send you a notification when this is being offered. Like with other delivery services; bad weather, holidays, and special events like the Super Bowl will trigger more delivery orders from customers.

You will receive a tote bag to transport your deliveries in that keeps the food temperature regulated, and a Postmates credit card to make purchases with (more details below).

Using the App and Picking Up/Dropping Off the Orders

Your phone will send you a notification when you are logged into the Postmates Fleet app (separate from the app the customers use) when there is an order available. You have the option to accept or reject an order. That I know of, there is not a penalty for rejecting an order. Be aware, though, that if you do not accept the order VERY QUICKLY, it will pass it on to another driver.

Once you accept an order, the app will give you a button to tap on for directions to the restaurant or store with a map. Each business has its own set of interaction with Postmates. Some are set up like GrubHub (if you’ve driven with them) where the order goes directly to the restaurant for them to prepare and the payment is processed solely between the business and the customer. With others there is nothing set up between Postmates and the merchant, so you must use your Postmates credit card to make the purchase at the store.

How this works is that whenever a customer submits an order for a merchant that hasn’t set up a payment system directly with Postmates, Postmates will add a balance on the card for the approximate value of the customer’s purchase (they always round up a little bit to accommodate everything). You will go into the store or restaurant and pay for the order with your card just like you’re a regular customer. You will NEVER have to pay using your own money- you only ever use the Postmates credit card.

Once you’ve picked up the order, you indicate this on the app and it will give you directions to the customer’s drop-off location. If gives you an option to text or call the customer if you need any help finding their place. Once you’ve dropped off the order you indicate this on the app and it closes out the order.

Certain items like tobacco products or alcohol will prompt for you to check the customer’s ID before giving them the merchandise.

The Pay

Now here’s the big question everybody has- how much do they pay? This is something that varies by region, but you can see detailed information by region here. The basic structure is that you get a base payment for every order, plus a small mileage reimbursement, payment for the time you spend waiting for orders to be prepared, and 100% of your tips. There is NO hourly pay or hourly minimum but there is a minimum guarantee per order.

This means that if you receive few to no orders you will not be guaranteed an hourly minimum so it is better to work during times where there is a guarantee of being busy.

Your pay is automatically transferred to your bank account within five business days of earning it. There is a $0.15 fee for every transfer to your bank.

Here’s an example of their payment structure

In Minneapolis you get a base payment of…

$1.75 per order + $0.14/minute for time waiting at pickup location + $0.91/mile for distance from pickup to drop-off location + your tips. You are also guaranteed a minimum of $4.10 per order (regardless of tips).

On your first order you had to wait 20 minutes for the restaurant to prepare the food and you drove 3 miles to deliver it, plus you got a $5.00 tip. So you get $1.75+$2.80+$2.73= $7.28 as your payment and $12.28 including your tip.

On your second order you didn’t have to wait because the food was ready to pick up, the customer was only 1 mile away, and you got $2.00 as a tip. Because $1.75+$0.91= $2.66, your payment would round up to $4.10 for a total of $6.10 with the tip.

Let’s say in this example it took you a total of 1 hour and 20 minutes to complete these two orders, including the time to go TO the pickup locations. This means you made $18.38 for two orders, or ~$13.80 per hour (not factoring in gas expenses). 

I would say a realistic expectation for Couriers in most midsize cities is to make $10-$15/hr. after factoring out taxes (take note that taxes are NOT deducted from your pay, but you will of course still have to pay them)  and gas expenses. I’ve heard people from cities like New York and San Francisco say they could make more than that due to more frequent orders and tips from larger ticket items, though, so it will probably be influenced heavily by the region you are working in.

Conclusion

The ability to get in your vehicle and work whenever you want is a very nice component of working for Postmates. For people with unpredictable schedules, or those that are trying to squeeze this work on top of another job, the flexibility Postmates offers could be a huge asset. Between GrubHub and Postmates, I will say that each company has it’s own pros and cons but I do consider one to necessarily be superior to the other. I will make a follow-up blog post where I discuss the differences in more depth.

If you are interested in trying out delivery driving with Postmates, I say go for it!

To apply to become a Postmates Courier, follow this link

For information on other delivery driving jobs, go here

Check out the Postmates Fleet Help Center for more information

If you enjoyed this post, make sure to follow this blog for more updates on frugal living, as well as stay updated on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Thanks for reading!

6 Things Job Ads Say That are Total Lies

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Not every job seems as appealing as others. Just as you pitch your skill set and work qualifications in a job interview, companies must pitch why you should apply for their positions so they attract the best talent.  There can be certain jobs that may ordinarily be a challenge for companies to get applicants for, so they’ll use codewords to make a position sound more enticing. Be wary when you see these terms, and make sure you understand what they could REALLY mean.

Here is a list of ten such terms to watch out for in job ads.

1. When they say: “Entry-Level Marketing” 

   What they could mean is: Sales Representative

There are many young, impressionable people looking to have their big break in the marketing field. Whether you went to college to get a marketing degree or are just looking to change careers, the promise of an entry-level job to break into the marketing world can seem enticing. Be warned, though, because many commission-based sales representative jobs, perhaps even door-to-door sales jobs, are masked behind this “entry-level marketing” label.

Sales jobs aren’t for everyone- the pay is inconsistent and the workload is stressful. That doesn’t mean you couldn’t actually break into a marketing career with such jobs, but do your background research on the company and job position before applying so you know what you’re getting into.  

2. When they say: “Accounts Receivable Specialist”

     What they could mean is: Collections Agent

When people think of accounting jobs, they might assume it means sitting quietly at a computer, posting journal entries into Quickbooks and preparing financial reports. However, when it comes to Accounts Receivable jobs this could be a clever way of wording something that’s really a call center-based Collections Agent instead of a gateway into a finance career. 

If you have ever been on the receiving end of a collections call, you know it isn’t usually a pleasurable experience. So consider if you really want to be the person calling cranky people to remind them to pay their bills. 

3. When they say: “Choose your own hours.”

     What they could mean is: You’ll be a contract worker.

With the rise of rideshare apps and the “sharing economy,” there are many side gigs that offer the ability to work whenever you want. Take note, though, that if you don’t have set hours it could be an independent contractor position instead of a job where you are an employee. This means that you don’t have the same rights as a worker if you get injured on the job, for instance. And you won’t necessarily have health insurance or other benefits associated with full-time employment. 

If you are unsure don’t be afraid to reach out to the company and ask whether or not it is a contract job!

4. When they say: “Fast-paced environment.”

     What they could mean is: This job is STRESSFUL!

A “fast-paced environment” could mean they want someone who is going to be able to juggle a large amount of tasks that are thrown at them with little time to complete such tasks. You may see this term used for jobs related to customer service or the restaurant industry. Some people enjoy the excitement of a job where you remain active throughout your shift, but for others a quiet environment is better suited for their needs. 

Consider whether you are ready for a work environment that is noisy and frantic when you see these words in a job ad.

5. When they say: “Preferred Qualifications”

     What they could mean is: If you don’t have these, you ain’t getting it.

Oftentimes if you don’t have their preferred qualifications, such as a college degree in a specific job field or a certain type of certification, your chances at getting an interview are slim to none. Your best bet will be if you have an alternative qualification such as years of related experience. Thus proves a bit of a conundrum: you need experience to get a job and you need a job to get experience.

If you can’t come up with an alternative qualification or a good angle for pitching yourself in the cover letter and interview process, it might be better to channel your energy towards applying for a different job.

6. When they say: “Flexibility and adaptability are preferred skills.”

     What they could mean is: Our office is dysfunctional.

Offices can struggle when there are inconsistent or contradictory expectations from different supervisors and employees, or a lack of communication between departments. This results in a work environment where one manager gives you a set of instructions and another gives you a different one. Thus proves a need for “adaptability.”

These contradictions can put a strain on productivity and result in an office that is somewhat disorganized. Think of how “adaptable” you really want to be.

If you enjoyed this post, make sure to follow this blog for more updates on frugal living, as well as stay updated on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Thanks for reading!

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Jobs Like GrubHub: 8 Alternatives for Delivery Drivers

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For my YouTube video on this topic, click here!

One thing’s for sure: rideshare apps and the the “sharing economy” are booming right now. After the rise of Uber, there are many countless tech startups looking to capitalize on services that offer customers work from freelancers with the touch of a smartphone. I’ve previously written about alternatives to Uber , but in this blog entry I’m going to specifically focus in on delivery driving alternatives that are similar to GrubHub.

I’ve previously worked as a GrubHub driver (read about my experiences here) and think it can be a good way to pick up some extra money, as long as you’ve got a vehicle and a phone. It is worth noting that in larger cities you can also deliver by bike or even by walking, so those are options as well. GrubHub isn’t the only option out there, however, and I want to show you the range of choice available.

Please note that each company operates in specific metro areas, so check on their respective websites to see if its available in your city before applying. 

Are you a driver for GrubHub, Fasten, or Doordash? Find out how to get paid DAILY with DailyPay here

Here are 8 alternatives for delivery drivers:

Uber EATS

We’ve all heard of Uber. They are clearly leaders in the world of ridesharing and their delivery business offered with Uber EATS is rapidly expanding across the globe. Uber EATS delivery partners can use either a car, bike, or scooter for work depending on what’s available in their city. You’ll deliver both food and other products customers have ordered with Uber EATS and your schedule is 100% up to you!

To drive you must be at least 19 years old, have a driver’s license, and a vehicle that is from 1997 or newer. What’s great about Uber EATS is they have a rapid sign-up process so you can get on the road very quickly, plus once you start work you can transfer your earnings to your bank account instantly after a delivery!

Apply here to become an Uber EATS delivery partner

Or to become an Uber driver for the rideshare service (for people not food), go here

Orderup

Orderup is a service very similar in its structure to GrubHub. Customers order through an app, and delivery drivers working as independent contractors deliver the food to them. The website says you can make up to $20/hr. as a driver and the hiring process can have you on the road in as little as 7-14 days.

Apply here

Caviar

Caviar offers a more curated experience to customers from restaurants that are more upscale. Their delivery workers, called “couriers,” can make up to $25/hr with flexible schedules. They are currently in 12 metropolitan areas but plan to expand. You can deliver with a variety of different vehicles (car, truck, motorcycle, bike) as a courier.

Apply here

DoorDash

This service is similar to GrubHub and Orderup in its structure. It’s worth noting that they offer their drivers (called Dashers) insurance while on their shifts. So if you were in an accident while working you could potentially file a claim though DoorDash’s insurance. You can drive, bike, or walk depending on the city as a Dasher.

Apply here

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Munchery

Munchery operates much differently than the other companies mentioned so far. Instead of picking up food from various restaurants, they have their own in-house team of chefs that make the meals. The meals are then chilled, boxed up, and delivered to the customers by the drivers (or bikers) after they order through the Munchery website or app. What’s also different is they hire employees rather than contract workers. With this you will have a specific, assigned schedule rather than the flexibility to work whenever, but you get full worker’s benefits- including a mileage reimbursement and data reimbursement for your phone.

Apply here

Postmates

Postmates is similar to GrubHub in that it focuses on food delivery, but it is much more versatile in terms of the job responsibilities.  Whereas GrubHub only delivers from restaurants that partner with their company, Postmates allows delivery from ANYWHERE the customer requests. Additionally, they can also request errands where you might be picking up products from a store or even picking up a customer’s dry cleaning. Their website claims you can make up to $25/hr. so it could be a good way to pick up some extra money.

Apply here

Favor

“Runners” for Favor do a variety of tasks such as get food and run errands for customers who request them through the app, similar to Postmates. You must have a car, bike, or motorcycle to be a Runner and are guaranteed a minimum of $10-$18 per hour depending on the city. Currently they are based out of several cities in Texas. Workers also wear distinctive blue shirts with a tuxedo design on them (see the website for pics).

Apply here

Instacart

This is a grocery delivery service that is currently operating in numerous metro areas throughout the United States. They partner with different grocery stores, such as Whole Foods, and some stores have dedicated Instacart check-out lanes. What’s nice about this service is that you can work either as a part-time employee or an independent contractor, with or without a car. If you have a car you can work as a driver, while if you don’t have a car or don’t wish to drive, you can work solely as a shopper who prepares orders for customers in a particular store. So overall it can be very flexible depending on your needs.

Apply here

If you enjoyed this post, make sure to follow this blog for more updates on frugal living, as well as stay updated on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Thanks for reading!

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Working as a GrubHub Driver- What’s it’s Like

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For my YouTube video on this topic, click here!

I’ve worked as  GrubHub Delivery Driver and thought I would share my experiences for those that are interested in applying for this job and want to know what’s it’s like. Hopefully you’ll find this helpful!

What is GrubHub?

GrubHub has been around a long time (since the late 90’s, which is ancient in internet years) and was originally a “hub” where restaurants could post their menus for online takeout ordering. As they have expanded and evolved over the years, this now includes GrubHub’s own delivery service that operates through an app.

GrubHub is able to provide drivers to restaurants that may or may not offer delivery on their own. Essentially restaurants are outsourcing their delivery to a third party. Not every restaurant is available for customers to order from (in contrast to Postmates) so as a driver you will only be delivering to restaurants that have contracted with GrubHub.

How Scheduling Works

You can pick your own schedule. It is totally up to you if you want to work 80 hours or 0 hours a week and you will not be penalized either way. You sign up for mini shifts (called “blocks”) that range from anywhere from 2-6 hours. They release all of the blocks at the start of the week and they are on a first come, first serve basis. So if you want to work you’ve got to snatch them up fast!

Unlike Uber, you cannot just get in your car and work anytime you feel like it. You do have to stick with the blocks you signed up for.  If you work during a time that you aren’t scheduled for you won’t get paid- so don’t do that!!

The Training/Requirements/Sign-on Process

The “interview” process was very easy- there wasn’t one! Basically as long as you pass the background check and have a good driving record (and there’s spots available) you can become a driver. With Uber and other similar services you have to have a recent (5-10 years old) car, but with GrubHub you do not. Thus, as long as you have a vehicle with four wheels that runs you are probably good.

Training varies depending on your city. Some places have regional offices where you do the training, but mine did not so I had to train through an online webcast thingy. Once you start working all communication with GrubHub occurs though their phone line or by email, which takes some getting used to. You have no direct manager so you get the benefit of not having someone looking over your shoulder. Yet you are also kind of in this thing without direct assistance so it has it’s pros and cons.

What Your Blocks are Like

You are assigned a specific geographic region and you HAVE to be in that region to get offers and get paid. You have to download an app on their website. If you have an iPhone there’s a GrubHub Driver app in the app store but this is NOT the current app so don’t download it, use the link they have in the emails they send you.

Once you are on your first block, you go to your region and sign in to the app. Your phone will ding whenever there’s an offer available. You’ll see the address on your phone of the restaurant, then you pick up the food and take it to the customer. If you are signed up for a block you work rain or shine, so remember that when signing up.

The Pay!!

Okay so you’re thinking blah blah blah get on with it, how much did you actually make!? I wanna make it rain! You will not get rich from GrubHub but can make SOME money. Here’s how the pay structure works- for every order you get a base amount (in my region it’s $3, but in larger cities like NYC or LA it will be higher), then they reimburse you for mileage (which is based on a straight line distance from the restaurant to the customer only, they don’t count driving to the restaurant itself), plus the tip.

So for example, if I got an order from a restaurant I would first get $3 automatically for delivering the food, the measly amount they give for mileage (let’s say I get $1.50), and then I get a tip for $3.50 I would have $8 total for the order. Usually I would get about 1-2 orders per hour.

Are you a driver with GrubHub, Doordash, or Fasten? Find out how you can get paid DAILY with DailyPay here

So let’s say I was working a three hour block in the evening, and the first two hours I picked up three orders for a total of $27, but the last hour is dead and I get no orders the final hour as I sit in my car pondering existential life questions (it happens). Technically I would make $27 from the orders, but GH guarantees an hourly minimum (varies by region but can be 10-14/hr), so then GB would bump it up to at least $30 for the three hours.

Here’s where it gets tricky- you can decline an order that pings in on your phone. So if it’s too far of a drive you can decide against it, but if you don’t accept 75% of the orders you are NOT guaranteed the minimum pay.

Take note that you are an independent contractor so you don’t get benefits. Plus you have to provide your own car insurance. They also don’t pay any extra car expenses.

Conclusion

One final note- some cities have GH deliverers who walk or bike so that’s an option, too. Working with GrubHub can be a good way to pick up some extra money so it’s definitely something to consider if it’s available in your area!

If you liked this blog post, make sure to check out my YouTube channel for more tips on frugal living and follow me on Twitter and Pinterest for additional updates.

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Jobs Like Uber: 15 Alternatives for Freelance Work

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For my YouTube video on this topic, click here!

We’ve all heard of Uber and many have been attracted to the flexibility that it’s “work anytime” policy offers. They are definitely a great option to check out, and you can always apply to become an Uber driver here. It turns out, though, that this is FAR from the only option if you are looking to pick up some extra money with freelance work. Here are 15 Uber alternatives that you can find work from!

Make sure to check the websites for availability in your area. The companies may not operate services in your city. 

Uber EATS

Uber EATS is a spinoff service from Uber that offers on-demand delivery of food and other products and it is rapidly expanding across the globe. Uber EATS delivery partners can use either a car, bike, or scooter for work depending on what’s available in their city. You’ll deliver both food and other products customers have ordered with Uber EATS and your schedule is 100% up to you!

To drive you must be at least 19 years old, have a driver’s license, and a vehicle that is from 1997 or newer. What’s great about Uber EATS is they have a rapid sign-up process so you can get on the road very quickly, plus once you start work you can transfer your earnings to your bank account instantly after a delivery!

Apply here to become an Uber EATS delivery partner

GrubHub Delivery

Think of the delivery service that GrubHub offers as kind of like “Uber for food.” Customers order food through the GrubHub app, a delivery driver is alerted from their own GrubHub Delivery app and the driver brings the food from the restaurant to the customer. This is something that I’ve had personal experience with and I would in general recommend it. It does differ from Uber in that you have to sign up for specific shifts and it doesn’t allow you to begin working at a whim’s notice (unless someone decides to suddenly drop a shift).

Apply here 

Check out my YouTube video on becoming a GrubHub driver

Find out how you get paid DAILY with DailyPay here

Wingz

Wingz is an app that is very much like Uber, except that it originally focused primarily on rides to and from airports. It has since expanded to offer pre-scheduled rides from anywhere, while still focusing on airports and special events (like sporting events or concerts).

Apply here

Turo

Turo is a service that lets you rent out your car for others to drive. So if you have an old roadster that’s collecting dust, this a good way to make some extra money off of it. According to their website, they offer a $1 million dollar insurance policy on vehicles that are used through the service that’s covered with the customer’s fees (although you can use your own insurance if you like and get more money from each transaction). Depending on the value of your car, you could literally make thousands of dollars a month from this-so it’s worth checking out!

List your car here

Wimdu

This services is a little like Airbnb, except that it focuses on city apartments. So if you have an urban dwelling you are willing to rent out to others while you’re away, this could be a good option for you!

List your apartment here

Roost

Roost is an app that lets you rent out storage space to others. This can include attics, basements, warehouses, sheds, or any other facility, whether indoors or outdoors. When you have extra storage space that isn’t being used this could be a helpful way to make some extra money.

List your space here

Instacart

This is a grocery delivery service that is currently operating in numerous metro areas throughout the United States. They partner with different grocery stores, such as Whole Foods, and some stores have dedicated Instacart check-out lanes. What’s nice about this service is that you can work either as a part-time employee or an independent contractor, with or without a car. If you have a car you can work as a driver, while if you don’t have a car or don’t wish to drive, you can work solely as a shopper who prepares orders for customers in a particular store. So overall it can be very flexible depending on your needs.

Apply here

Postmates

Postmates is similar to GrubHub in that it focuses on food delivery, but it is much more versatile in terms of the job responsibilities.  Whereas GrubHub only delivers from restaurants that partner with their company, Postmates allows delivery from ANYWHERE the customer requests. Additionally, they can also request errands where you might be picking up products from a store or even picking up a customer’s dry cleaning. Their website claims you can make up to $25/hr. so it could be a good way to pick up some extra money.

Become a Postmate

Amazon Flex

With Amazon Flex, you can turn your vehicle into a package delivery mobile by delivering for Amazon. It is currently operating in more than 30 cities, with more coming down the pipeline eventually. Delivery drivers for Amazon use their own vehicle, set their own hours, and will deliver both same day orders from Amazon Now as well as regular package deliveries in place of Fedex or UPS.

Apply here

Dolly 

Dolly operates as a moving service that is app-based. So if you are in the mood for some heavy lifting, this will be good for you! You can work as either a “Helper,” or someone with a truck or cargo van they’ll drive in addition to moving, or a “Hand,” which is someone who assists with moving but doesn’t provide their own vehicle. Both Helpers and Hands need to be able to lift up to 75 pounds, so if you aren’t keen on physical labor you might need to look elsewhere.

Apply here

HelloTech (merged with Geekatoo)

Are you a tech geek? Then this might be the job for you. HelloTech is an on-demand tech support service that provides technical assistance to both individuals and businesses. They offer a broad range of services for everything from computer support, TV mounting and installation, assistance with wireless networks, and helping people use their smartphones.

Apply here

Freelancer and UpWork

These services are very similar so I’ve included them together. They are websites that post a directory of companies seeking help with projects that freelance workers can apply to. If you have skills ranging from data entry, graphic design, digital marketing to accounting this could be a good place to look for some extra work. After setting up an account with them, you can apply for whichever jobs you like and the companies will make their own hiring decisions. If you are looking to make some extra money, it wouldn’t hurt to set up accounts on both websites!

Freelancer website

UpWork website

LawnLove

We all trimmed a neighbor’s lawn or two as teenagers to earn some extra money, so why not try it again? With this service you can offer lawn services from mowing, weed-eating, to snow removal. You MUST provide your own equipment and truck, so take note of this. Once you’ve applied and been approved you can pick whatever jobs you like and set your own hours.

Apply here

Thumbtack

Whether you are a cake decorator, personal trainer, housecleaner, or repairman (or woman!), Thumbtack offers a website and app that can connect you with people interested in hiring you for freelance work. Notable for its wide-ranging versatility, this service can be great for almost anyone.

Apply here

If you liked this blog post, please make sure to check out my YouTube channel and follow The Thrifty Man on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest for more tips on saving money and making money! Make it rain!

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